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Convict Ship Minerva 1824

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Convict Ship Minerva 1824



Embarked: 173 men (one man re-landed)
Voyage: 128 days
Deaths: 2
Surgeon's Journal : yes
Previous vessel: Mangles arrived 27 October 1824
Next vessel: Ann and Amelia arrived 2 January 1825
Captain John Bell Surgeon Superintendent Alexander Nisbet
Prisoners and passengers of the Minerva identified in the Hunter Valley


The Minerva was built at Lancaster in 1804. [1] This was the last of four voyages bringing convicts to New South Wales, the others being in 1818, 1819 and 1821.

The prisoners of the Minerva had been convicted in England and Scotland. Many were held on Hulks for months while awaiting transportation. In January 1825 John Henry Capper, Superintendent of ships made the following report regarding the employment of convicts on the hulks in the previous months -


REPORT of John Henry Capper, Esq. Superintendent of Ships and Vessels employed for the Confinement of Offenders under Sentence of Transportation ;

25th January 1825.
Sir,

I have the honour of making a further Report to you upon the state of the Convict Hulks stationed at Portsmouth, Sheerness, Chatham, Woolwich, Deptford, and Bermuda.

The Convicts confined on board the Leviathan, York and Hardy Hulks, in Portsmouth harbour, have been employed in carrying on the Public Works under the Naval and Ordnance Boards, and the principal officers of those departments have expressed their approbation of the Prisoners conduct when on shore executing their tasks of labour.

The Prisoners confined in the Retribution Hulk at Sheerness have been kept at labour in the Dock Yard at that place, and have given satisfaction to the officers under whom they are employed.

The Convict Boys confined in the Hulk stationed at that port, have been constantly employed in making clothing and other articles for the whole of the Hulk Establishment, allowing a suitable time in each day for relaxation and attending school.

The Convicts on board the Dolphin Hulk at Chatham have been employed in various works under the Naval and Ordnance Departments, and their conduct has been orderly and industrious when at labour.

At Woolwich and Deptford, the Convicts confined in the Ganymede and Discovery Hulks have been efficiently employed in the Dock Yards there, and the officers at both those depots have expressed to me their approbation of the Prisoners behaviour. The works upon which the Convicts are employed under the Ordnance Department at Woolwich have been very limited, but as the complement of Prisoners usually confined in the Justitia Hulk has of late been considerably reduced by the transfer of several to other depdts, and the transportation of many of them, no inconvenience has been felt for want of employment for those now on board that Hulk.

The Convicts throughout all the Ships have been healthy, and with some slight exceptions they have been orderly and obedient. The officers and guards have conformed to the regulations laid down for their guidance. The Chaplains Reports I have the honour to enclose. The Surgeons have fulfilled their, duties in a satisfactory manner, and have kept the Hospitals in good order. On the ist of January 1824, there were 2,953 Prisoners on board all the Convict Hulks in England, since which period there have been received (including 440 from the Penitentiary) 2,801; 1,885 have been transported; 542 discharged by pardon or otherwise; 15 have escaped; 82 have died; and 3,230 remained in the Hulks on the 1st of January instant. - Accounts and Papers



Departure

The Minerva sailed from London on 14 July 1824 with one hundred and seventy-two convicts, one having been re-landed before sailing.



Military Guard

The guard consisted of Major Tobias Kirkwood, Quarter Master Francis Hales and 43 men of the 40th regiment. In July 1825 Major Tobias Kirkwood commanded a detachment of the 40th ordered to relieve the 3rd (Buffs) in Hobart. He was promoted to Lieut-Colonel in 1828. On this voyage of the Minerva he kept a Private Journal from his Embarkation at Deptford, on the 22nd of June, 1824. The journal breaks off at Capetown on 23 September 1824. There are also 23 letters from Major Kirkwood to his wife written from Sydney dated 1-23 January 1825. [2].



Cabin Passengers

Passengers Mrs. Hales and three children and Mrs. Bell.



Surgeon Alexander Nisbet

This was Alexander Nisbet's first appointment to a convict ship. He kept a Medical Journal from 21 June to 20 November 1824 -

The earlier part of our passage in the channel was rough and stormy and there was plenty of sea sickness, the usual attendant on all commencing voyages, but without any immediate bad effect on the health of our freight. Psora, however appeared to a considerable extent and gave a good deal of trouble before it could be finally subdued. We at last succeeded by carefully separating the infected and preventing the use of their clothes and blankets until after washing and fumigating them. [5]



Cape of Good Hope

They experienced bad weather making it impossible to keep the prison adequately ventilated and scurvy began to affect the men. They were compelled to stop at the Cape of Good Hope to replenish supplies and remained there about three weeks while the doctor obtained everything he could to restore the prisoners' health.

Extract of a letter from the Cape of Good Hope, dated the 1st October: 'Poor Edwards, who has been condemned to seven years' transportation for a supposed libel, without proof by witnesses of any sort, was sent to Robin Island, a place where convicts are usually sent to. The Minerva convict ship touched lately at Simon's Bay, on her way to New South Wales, on which Edwards was brought to Simon's Bay to be put on board. Shortly after his arrival, he, in despair, cut his throat, but being interrupted in the act he did not accomplish his purpose. [3]

When they departed from the Cape on 1st October 1824 William Edwards sailed with them. Select here to find out more about William Edwards (alias Alexander Lookaye) who was first sent to Australia as a convict on the Atlas in 1819.


The Voyage

A great number of prisoners had been unwell on this voyage and at the end of the voyage the surgeon contemplated what may have caused this

- I suspect that it lay in the ship herself, she having taken out her convicts unhealthy for the two previous voyages, sending each time a great number of men to hospital, this suspicion is confirmed in some measure by the decision of a board of Survey held on her at Sydney who judged it to be improper from evidence laid before them to send troops in her to India. I tried to remove whatever might be the cause of diseases by the most unremitting attention and supporting their spirits by every indulgence in my power. By attention to cleanliness and encouraging amusements, having provided myself with musical instruments there were occasional dances of an evening in which all took great pleasure. [5]



Bass Strait

The ship had a narrow escape from disaster on 14th November -

The Hobart Town Gazette reported the incident - Important to Navigators.-Captain Bell, Commander of the Minerva, has favoured us with an account of an important discovery of a rock he fell in with on his passage hither we give the account in Captain Bell's own words : ' I send you the particulars of a dangerous rock, immediately in the fairway for passing through Bass's Straits, to the southward of King's Island, and which is not placed in Flinders' charts, or the French charts of Captain Freycinet.-The Minerva on her last passage narrowly escaped getting upon it, on the 14th November, at one p.m. running at the rate of nine miles per hour ; Reid's Rocks just seen from the deck ; bearing north six miles. The Black Pyramid E.S.E. A heavy breaker was seen to rise not more than one half mile distant from us, and which we passed between ; and Reid's Rocks at not more than three cable lengths; although there was a considerable swell at the time, it did not break oftener than three or four minutes space. Our latitude at the time,40°26' south, by an indifferent observation. Should you have room for insertion of the position of this danger, in your Paper, it will be useful for those passing that way.'[7]



Port Jackson

The Minerva arrived in Port Jackson on 19 November 1824.



Convict Muster

A Muster was held by the Colonial Secretary Frederick Goulburn on the 22nd November 1824. The prisoners appeared in good health and declared themselves well treated and spoke favourably of the Surgeon Superintendent and Commander.

The indents reveal the name, age, calling, when and where tried, sentence, native place, physical description, conduct on the voyage and where assigned on arrival. There is also some information about colonial crimes and deaths included. Two prisoners died on the voyage - *William Jessen and another and sixteen men sent to the hospital in Sydney on arrival.



Carter's Barracks

The younger prisoners were assigned to Carter's Barracks - James Buckley 17, George Campbell 15, John Carter 15, Charles Chamberlain 16, Henry Davis 15, Robert Davidson 18, Thomas Harry 17, Edward Johnson 17, William Moore 16, George Sharpley 16 and David Simpson 17.

David Simpson had received a good conduct report from his time on the ship however at the Carter's Barracks he misbehaved and as punishment was put to work on the treadmill. His gruesome demise was reported in The Australian on 13th January... aged 18, named Simpson, a prisoner in the Carters barracks, met his death in the following dreadful manner: -- While undergoing the punishment of the tread mill in the forenoon, he dropped some halfpence into the interior of the wheel - on returning from his dinner, to resume his work, he made an attempt to recover his money by thrusting his arm underneath ; at this moment the men on the opposite side commenced working the wheel, and his head was drawn in, and crushed to a mummy. Life was extinct before he could be extricated. The unfortunate boy had only just arrived in the Colony in the Minerva.



Bushrangers

David Simpson wasn't the only Minerva convict to make news. Only a few months after arrival three of the men - John Lomas, Abraham Thompson and William Leddington took to the bush. They robbed a cart on the Richmond Road and were soon pursued by settlers. After a furious battle two were captured, John Lomas and Abraham Thompson. William Leddington escaped but was later captured. In 1827 Leddington was one of the pirates who Seized the brig Wellington on the voyage to Norfolk Island. He was executed with five others in March 1827.



Crew

The name of the Chief Mate and some of the seamen was revealed in the Sydney Gazette, after a court case took place in January 1825. Two of the sailors J. Wilson and G. Chapman were tried and found guilty of assaulting the Chief Mate, Mr. Long on the Minerva after a violent altercation about shore leave and grog. Their dispute had resulted in the whole of the crew seizing the jolly boat and accompanying their messmates Wilson and Chapman to gaol in Sydney.[4] Wilson and Chapman were later sentenced to 1 and 2 months imprisonment.



Captain John Bell

Early in February Captain John Bell, was indicted for a misdemeanor, in making use of highly improper and unbecoming language to John Nicholson, Esq. Harbour master of Port Jackson, while in the execution of his duty on the 28th of January, such language having a tendency to excite Mr. Nicholson to a breach the peace. A survey of the ship Minerva had been ordered by the Governor which survey not meeting the approbation of Capt. Bell, he went to Mr. Nicholson's office, and, in the presence of several witnesses, used the offensive epithets, stated in the information. Upon the second count, Capt. Bell was found Guilty. The learned Attorney General, then informed the Court, on the part of the prosecutor (Mr. Nicholson), that he should not press for judgment, and here the transaction ended.



Departure from the Colony

The Minerva sailed for Madras later in February 1824.



Convicts of the Minerva identified in the Hunter Valley region


Name Notes
Bird, John Errand boy. Tried in Warwick 27 March and sentenced to 14 years transportation . Age 18, native of Birmingham. Assigned to Standish Lawrence Harris at Hunter River on arrival. In April 1825 Assigned to Government service. Sentenced by the Commandant Captain Allman to 25 lashes for neglect of work and insolence to his overseer
Bolton, Frederick Native of Manchester age 19. Mantle maker. Sentenced to transportation for life. Well behaved on the voyage out. Assigned to Mr. Lang on arrival. Drowned in the service of Mr. Crawford at Invermein in July 1837
Booth, Edward Age 55. Occupation Ostler. Native place Westmoreland. Tried Lancaster 15 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Good behaviour on the voyage out. Assigned to Mr. Smith at Balcombe Hills on arrival. In 1837 he resided at Patrick Plains and was a Ticket of Leave holder. He died at Newcastle in June 1842 and was buried at Christ Church Burial Grounds
Brimmell, Edward Age 18. Fisherman. Native place London. Tried London April 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life for burglary. Granted a Ticket of Leave December 1838 for the district of Newcastle. Granted a Conditional Pardon March 1845. Spouse Abigail Smith (CF). Issue Edward, Anna, Frances Ann, William John, James Joseph, Edward, Alexander, Charles and Elizabeth
Broadhead, Samuel Soldier. Native of Yorkshire. Tried 14 March 1824 and sentenced to transportation for life. Age 25. Assigned to John Cobb at Rushholme on arrival. In October 1825 Samuel Broadhead, William Denison and Caleb Tandy in the service of John Cobb, were charged with absconding from their master's service. Mr. Cobb states...the prisoners absconded from my service some weeks since and were subsequently taken and lodged in Sydney gaol. I should be glad to have them returned to my service. The Chief Constable states ....the prisoners were given into my custody on the 28th inst....they arrived from Sydney in the Government brig Amity. The prisoners being asked if they had any excuse to urge for absconding stated they had no complaints except that the overseer sometimes called them to their work before day break. Sentenced to 50 lashes each and to returned to their master. Samuel Broadhead was granted a Ticket of Leave for Maitland or Patterson Plains districts in 1831. In July 1831 he was sent from Newcastle gaol to Sydney to be identified. His Ticket was subsequently cancelled for robbery. He was assigned to the A. A. Company at Port Stephens in 1836. In November 1838 he was granted a Ticket of Leave for Port Stephens. In May 1839 the Ticket was altered to Maitland. In 1844 his Ticket was alter to Port Stephens and in June 1845 altered again for district of Maitland
Bronger, James Age 19. Occupation carter. Native place Walmer. Tried at Maidstone 15 March 1824 and sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to Standish Lawrence Harris on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Parramatta in January 1840
Buck, Charles Age 21. Carter. Native place Maidstone. Tried 15 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to Mr. Phillips near Newcastle on arrival. He married Ann McDonald (ship Forth 1830) at Maitland in March 1833. He was granted a Ticket of Leave for Upper Hunter River in 1833. In 1838 he absconded from service and was later apprehended. He was sent to Newcastle gaol and his Ticket cancelled. In August 1840 he was granted a Ticket of Leave passport allowing him to pass to Cassilis and Southward of that district in the service of R. Fitzgerald for 12 months.
Burrows, John Age 32. Road maker. Native place Cambridgeshire. Tried 14 July 1823 in York. Sentenced to transportation for life. Received 3 dozen lashes for throwing his irons overboard on the voyage out. Assigned to Captain Wright at Newcastle in 1828. Assigned to William Bowen at Maitland in 1837. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Maitland in August 1842.. Married Catherine Field (ship Minerva 1839) at Maitland in 1846. Granted a Ticket of Leave passport in March 1846, allowed to travel between Maitland and Newcastle in the service of W. C. Wentworth for six months. Granted a Conditional Pardon in July 1847
Campbell, George Age 15. Weaver. Native place Liverpool. Tried at Lancaster 16 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Sent to Carters Barracks on arrival. In 1825 assigned to John Hillier when he was sentenced to 50 lashes for theft. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Patrick Plains in 1836. In September 1839 granted a Ticket of Leave Passport, allowed to proceed to Liverpool Plains in the employ of John Johnston for 12 months on recommendation of Patrick Plains bench
Coates, Thomas Age 18. Butcher. Native place Oldborough. Tried at Warwick 23 March 1824. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Assigned to Mr. Wilkinson near Newcastle in 1824/25. Assigned to Edward Sparke, George St. Sydney on arrival. In 1828 assigned to Andrew Sparke near Newcastle. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Newcastle in July 1831. Ticket altered to Maitland in September 1831. Married Margaret Purcell (ship Forth 1830) of Maitland in 1831. Granted a Ticket of Leave dated 14 October 1845 for district of Hartley. Note in indents. - Norfolk Island
Davidson, Robert Age 18. Native place London. Tried Horsemonger Lane December 1823. Sentenced to 7 years transportation. Sent to Carters Barracks on arrival . In 1824 / 25 assigned to government employment at Newcastle. In 1826 while in the service of John Francis Wickham at Newcastle he was charged with disobedience of his master's orders and insolence. Mr. Wickham states - Yesterday evening I desired the prisoner to fetch some articles I wanted from Mr. Bouchers warehouse. He went and remaining absent nearly a quarter of an hour, I sent another person in search of him, who returning informed me the prisoner was in the street talking to some men; I went to him and asked him if he knew how long he had been absent on his message - he replied - An hour I suppose - I told him I did not want such insolent replied from him, that he well knew he had been away only about ten minutes; As I walked away I heard several impertinent observations from the group amongst which the prisoner stood and I heard him very distinctly say - Which way does the bull run - He was also insolent to me and my wife on Sunday night. The prisoner denies having used the latter expression, says it was uttered by one of the party with whom he stood. Sentenced to 50 lashes
Dennison, William Age 32. Pedlar. Tried in London. Sentenced to 7 years transportation. Assigned to Mr. Cobb on arrival. In October 1825 - Samuel Broadhead, William Denison and Caleb Tandy in the service of John Cobb charged with absconding from their master's service. Mr. Cobb states...the prisoners absconded from my service some weeks since and were subsequently taken and lodged in Sydney gaol. I should be glad to have them returned to my service. The Chief Constable states ....the prisoners were given into my custody on the 28th inst....they arrived from Sydney in the Government brig Amity. The prisoners being asked if they had any excuse to urge for absconding stated they had no complaints except that the overseer sometimes called them to their work before day break. Sentenced to 50 lashes each and to returned to their master
Earp. William Age 24. Tailor from Derby. Tried 17 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to Mr. Pendray in Sydney on arrival. Absconded from Hyde Park Barracks in July 1826. Absconded from No. 25 road gang in April 1829. Noted as a notorious runaway. Assigned to Moses Brown in 1831. Transferred to the A. A. Company at Port Stephens in April 1831. Died on 24 March 1832 at the Company's hospital at Carrington after a severe attack of Angina Pectoris
Edwards, William Alias Alexander Lookaye. Educated for the bar. Tried in Cape town 4th May 1824 and sentenced to 7 years transportation. Native of North Wales. 5ft 8 3/4 in, hazel eyes, brown hair, rather bald. Brown complexion. Remarkably well behaved on the voyage. Assigned to Port Macquarie on arrival. Poor Edwards, who has been condemned to seven years' transportation, for a proposed libel, without proof by witnesses of any sort, was sent to Robin Island, a place where convicts are usually sent to. The Minerva convict ship touched lately at Simon's Bay, on her way to New South Wales, on which Edwards was brought to Simon's Bay, to be put on board. Shortly after his arrival, he, in despair, cut bis throat; but being interrupted in the act, he did not accomplish his purpose.
Farmer, Joseph Age 45. Indoor servant from Wiltshire. Tried in London October 1823. Sentenced to transportation for life. Well behaved on the voyage out. Assigned to Mr. James in King St. Sydney on arrival . In November 1824 assigned servant of Alexander Brodie Spark near Newcastle
Fletcher, Mark Age 25. Miner from Yorkshire. Tried 26 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to Edward Riley at Wooloomooloo on arrival . In December 1835, assigned to the A. A. Company at Newcastle, sentenced to 75 lashes for drunkenness. In October 1837 sentenced to 50 lashes for insolence. Had stepped from the ranks and demanded of William Croasdill why his ration of tobacco had been stopped. In January 1838 charged with being absent without leave and sentenced to 2 months on the treadmill at Sydney. Granted a Ticket of Leave for district of Newcastle in 1841. In 1844 he requested to have his Ticket of Leave altered from Newcastle to Maitland where he had found employment approved by the Magistrate. Granted a Conditional Pardon in 1848
Forrester, William Age 17. Indoor Servant from Birmingham. Tried at Warwick March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to P. Caspur, King St. Sydney on arrival. Absconded from service of Alexander Livingstone at Newcastle in August 1827
Frost, Thomas Age 21. Carter from Reading. Tried at Warwick. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to Major West at Windsor on arrival. Note in indent - no shoes. Assigned to Henry Kiernan at Dartbrook in June 1832
Green, Henry Age 22. Ploughman from Stoke. Tried at Lancaster 11 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Blue eyes, red hair, red freckled complexion. Received 2 dozen lashes on the voyage out. Assigned to Thomas Black at Paterson in 1837.Granted a Ticket of Leave for Maitland district in October 1840. Applied to marry Elizabeth Collins (ship Roslin Castle) in December 1840. Sent to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence to an iron gang. Sent to Hyde Park Barracks when his sentence expired in April 1842
Hampton, James Age 19. Gardener from Bradford. Tried at Maidstone 15 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Good behaviour on the voyage out. Assigned to Dr. Wentworth on arrival. Assigned to Mr. Frankland in December 1824. Assigned to Government service at Newcastle in 1825. Assigned to Francis Allman at Rathluba in 1828. Granted a Ticket of Leave passport to travel with teams between Windsor and Sydney in the service of John Wood for 12 months in March 1839
Herrod, Thomas Age 16. Chimney sweep from South Nottinghamshire. Tried at Radford January 1824. Sentenced to 7 years transportation. Assigned to Mr. Cobb at Evan on arrival. In 1828 assigned to John Laurio Platt at Iron Bark Creek near Newcastle.
Hickman, George Age 24. Ploughman. Tried at Nottingham 17 July 1823. Sentenced to 7 years transportation. Tolerable conduct on the voyage out. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Patrick Plains in 1829. Granted a Certificate of Freedom in 1831. Applied to marry Jane Ahern (ship Southworth) in 1834
Kelly, John Age 24. Soldier from Dublin. Tried at Lancaster 10 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Received 3 dozen lashes on the voyage out. Assigned to Mr. Duncomb at Botany on arrival. Stationed at Port Macquarie in 1825. Sentenced to 3 years in irons in 1832. Absconded from service of Donald McIntyre in May 1837 and apprehended in June.
Langdale, George Age 21. Ploughman from Durham. Tried at York March 1824. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Assigned to John Blaxland at Patrick Plains in 1828 and employed as a shepherd.
Lester, Joseph Age 21. Ostler from Croydon. Tried at Kingston 27 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Well behaved on the voyage out. Assigned to Mrs. Arkell in Pitt St. Sydney on arrival. In 1828 assigned to Lieut. Palmer at Richmond Vale and employed as a stockman. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Maitland in 1836 which was cancelled for cattle stealing at Maitland in January 1843
Lewis, William Age 24. Miller from Derbyshire. Tried 17 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to C. J. Smith at Appin on arrival. Ticket of Leave holder when he died at Patrick Plains 1846.
Lilley, John Ploughs, shears. Tried at Maidstone March 1823 and sentenced to transportation for life. Age 28. Well behaved. Assigned to George Loder at Windsor on arrival. Assigned to Andrew Loder at Patrick Plains in 1828. Employed as a shepherd. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Patrick Plains in 1833.
Longbottom, James Age 22. Ploughs, shears. Native place Preston. Tried at York 30 March 1824. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Tolerable conduct on the voyage out. Assigned to Mrs. Hovell at Minto on arrival. Assigned to government employment at Newcastle in 1825. In February 1826 while in government service he was charged with neglect of work. William Moore, overseer of the mines, stated - Yesterday I called to Longbottom to do his work. His reply was he would do it tomorrow. The work was at a stand in consequence of his neglect; I told him a second time to finish hi work that day, he again repeated he would do it tomorrow. He did not do his work. He only wheeled one skip and should have wheeled ten. At 5 o'clock when the superintendent was present I was calling to him for half an hour, and received no answer. He is frequently insolent both to me and the marker. The prisoner in his defence states that the marker had told him that his task was finished that his work was not wanted. Sentenced to 50 lashes. In 1829 - A resident of Newcastle unearthed a valuable book relating to early convict days in Newcastle containing original depositions of the cases heard at the Newcastle Police Office in the year 1829.... .James Longbottom for obtaining money under false pretences, was sentenced to receive 50 lashes. It was shown that the man called upon one William Smith a boat builder and said that he had been sent by the master of the cutter Eura Kemp to get 1 dollar from Smith. Henry Lawler the master of the cutter denied that the prisoner had any authority to go to Smith on his account. James Longbottom was appointed scourger/ flagellator in room of Robert Young at Newcastle in September 1830. In April 1831 he was sentenced to 7 days solitary confinement at Newcastle for admitting spirits to the watch house. Sentenced to solitary confinement again in August 1831. Discharged to be returned to his master Mr. Nowlan two weeks later. Absconded from No. 42 road gang in March 1832. He was apprehended and admitted to Newcastle gaol with the following information - Born in 1802. 5' 4 3/4"; stout, fair complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes. Tattoos. Missing 2 front teeth. Lately a flagellator at Newcastle. Thence to a road gang, now sentenced to 2 years transportation for absconding and robbery. In 1837 he was assigned to J. K McKenzie at Liverpool
Marsland, John Age 17, convicted of burglary at Lancaster Assizes on 10 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to Carter's Barracks in Sydney in 1825. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Invermein in 1833. Still at Invermein in 1837. In August 1839 correspondence from Edward Denny Day revealed the following - Having been informed that John Marsland applied without my knowledge for a conditional pardon, I beg to inform you that I consider he is quite unworthy of such a boon, being a drunken and troublesome person. It was only yesterday that he was convicted of drunkenness at this office and informed that a repetition would lead to the probably cancellation of his Ticket of Leave. Applied to marry Elizabeth Allsopp (ship Surry) in January 1842
McCaffer, Edward Weaver age 17 from Edinboro. Tried at Glasgow 22 September 1823. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to A. B. Sparke at Evan on arrival. In April 1825 at Newcastle - William Crisp and Edward McAffar assigned to James Mudie. Sentenced by Magistrate Robert Scott to 50 lashes for absconding. On 13 May 1834, absconded from James Mudie again. Assigned to John Larnach at Patrick Plains in 1837. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Patrick Plains in 1839. Sent to Newcastle gaol from Singleton in April 1844 charged with stealing a saddle belonging to Robert Cross of Patrick Plains.
Machonochie, Peter Weaver from Dumarton age 19. Tried at Glasgow 25 September 1823. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Assigned to John Blaxland on arrival. At Patrick Plains in 1828 employed as a shepherd by John Blaxland
Menzies, Andrew Indoor servant age 28 from Perthshire. Tried at Edinboro 4 November 1823. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Maitland in 1833 on recommendation of Newcastle bench
Mackay, Alexander Native place Leith. Tried at Glasgow 25 September 1823. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Employed as a shepherd by John Blaxland junior at Patrick Plains in 1828. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Evan in December 1832
Mold, Thomas Carter age 23 from London. Tried at London 3 December 1823. Sentenced to transportation for life. In 1828 assigned to Francis Moran at Ravensfield employed as labourer. Died at Queanbeyan in August 1850.
Moore, John Coach trimmer age 21 from Hammersmith. Tried at London 14 April 1824. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. In March 1827 charged with disrespectful conduct to the court. Sentenced to one month hard labour in the gaol gang. Married Charlotte Smith at Newcastle in 1832. In April 1837 residing at Newcastle, his Ticket of Leave was transferred to Maitland
Moore, William In 1824, assigned to George Townshend at Trevallyn, Paterson, and employed as a bullock driver
Moss, Thomas Dyer age 20 from Leeds. Tried 20 March 1824 in York. Sentenced to transportation for life for burglary. In 1824 assigned to A. B. Sparke near Newcastle. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Illawarra district in August 1843. Granted a Conditional Pardon in 1848.
Neugent, James James Nugent alias Newton age 24. Carter from Southwark. Tried Kingston 27 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to John Blaxland at Newington on arrival. In 1828 employed as a watchman by John Blaxland at Patrick Plains. Granted a Ticket of Leave in 1833. In 1837 a Ticket of Leave holder residing at Newcastle.
Newman, George Age 24. Pot boy from Chelsea. Tried in London 4 June 1823. Sentenced to transportation for life. Tolerable conduct on the voyage out. Sent to Port Macquarie on arrival . In 1828 assigned to the A. A. Company at Port Stephens and employed as a labourer
Newton, David Age 34. Carter from Manchester. Tried at Maidstone July 1823. Sentenced to transportation for life. In 1828 assigned to Road gang No. 27. In August 1831 sent to Newcastle gaol. To be confined in a cell for 7 days save 1 hour daily during which he was to be employed in the purposes of the police in charge of a constable.. In September 1831 he was employed as a flagellator when he was sent to Newcastle gaol, to be confined until further notice. In September 1833 at Paterson he was on the Return of Corporal Punishment inflicted by Sentence of the Bench in the presence of P.N. Anley, Magistrate. 50 lashes for drunkenness and neglect as scourger. Back much cut but did not bleed. In 1837 he was assigned to the hospital in Sydney. In October 1840 he was sent to Newcastle gaol from New England district and from there sent to Hyde Park Barracks. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Wollongong district in January 1844. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Windsor in March 1845. Granted a Conditional pardon in September 1850
Nicholls, William Age 22. Tried at Warwick March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Well behaved on the voyage out. Assigned to Byrne Milkman Sydney on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for district of Maitland in 1841
Pain, Edward Age 23. Ploughman from Kent. Tried at Maidstone 15 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Good behaviour on the voyage out. Assigned to A. B. Sparke at Evan on arrival. In 1824 assigned to A. B. Spark and to be victualled form the Store for 6 months. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Patrick Plains district in 1834. In 1837 assigned to John Woolridge at Maitland. He married Ann Hanratty. Their daughter Sarah was born at Wollombi in 1839. He was granted a Ticket of Leave for Wollombi in June 1840
Robinson, Robert Upholsterer from York. Tried at Selby 23 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Well behaved on the voyage out. Assigned to Edward Hunt, George St. Sydney on arrival. Absconded from Hunt in April 1831. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Sydney in December 1833. His ticket of leave was cancelled in April 1834 for aiding and assisting in a robbery. In August 1839 he was granted a Ticket of leave for the district of Invermein. In December 1841 he was allowed to proceed to Liverpool Plains in the service of Thomas Stewart for 12 months on the recommendation of the Scone bench. In January 1842 granted a Ticket of Leave pass, allowed to remain at Liverpool Plains in the service of Mr. Wightman for 12 months. In January 1845 allowed to proceed to Liverpool Plains in the service of Charles Smith on the recommendation of the Murrurundi bench. Ticket of Leave granted 1845 cancelled on 22 April 1851 for absence from his district
Ronaldson, David DAge 18. Errand boy from Breadalbane. Tried at Edinboro 1 December 1823. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Indifferent conduct on voyage out. Assigned to A. B. Sparke on arrival . In November 1824 in service to Spark and to be victualled from the Stores at Newcastle for 6 months. In December 1824 at Newcastle, assigned to James Mudie. Sentenced by the Bench at Wallis Plains to 50 lashes for wantonly killing a pig and wounding another. Assigned to government service at Newcastle in 1825. In April 1825 Thomas Walsh per Mangles and Donald Ronaldson both in service to government, charged with indecorous conduct during divine service and admonished. In August 1825 Assigned to Government. Sentenced to 50 lashes for leaving the Hospital at unreasonable hours without leave and on a strong suspicion of being concerned in a robbery. In December 1826 he absconded from government service at Wallis Plains
Shaw, John Age 35. Butcher from Glasgow. Tried at Greenock 22 September 1823. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Assigned to Mr. Crawford on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Maitland in May 1832. Assigned to Government service at Patrick Plains in 1837
Taylor, Thomas Himley Alias Henley age 26. Writing master from Newcastle upon Tyne. Tried at York 16 March 1823. Sentenced to transportation for life. Behaved very well on the voyage out. Sent to Hyde Park Barracks on arrival. In December 1825 absconded from Emu Plains - hazel eyes, rusty hair, pale complexion. Noted as an expert penman. . Absconded from No. 7 road party in February 1833. Charged with forgery. Still at large in 1840
Thomas, Benjamin Age 19. Painter and glazier from Devonport. Tried 11 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Assigned to Ann Bennett in Sydney on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Parramatta district in July 1831. Ticket of Leave cancelled for being absent from his district In January 1838
Thorpe, James Age 24. Native place London. Tried at York 25 March 1824. Sentenced to transportation for life. Received 1 dozen lashes for mistreatment of his fellow prisoner on the voyage out. Sent to Windsor for distribution on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Maitland in April 1840. Ticket cancelled for drunkenness in July 1840. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Hartley in March 1841.
Watts, John Age 31. Boatman from Wolverhampton. Tried at Worcester 8 March 1824. Sentenced to 14 years transportation. Assigned to Mrs. Hely on arrival . Granted a Ticket of Leave for Maitland in 1833 and in 1836
Wells, William Age 17. Carter from Middburn. Tried at London June 1823. Sentenced to transportation for life. Standish Lawrence Harris at Bathurst on arrival. In 1828 assigned to John Galt Smith at Woodville and employed as a stockman. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Illawarra district in 1841
Wood, George Age 19. Carter from Derbyshire. Tried at Lincoln 8 March 1823. Sentenced to transportation for life. In 1825 assigned to James Phillips in the district of Newcastle. At hospital at Newcastle in November 1828. Appointed constable at Maitland in January 1832. Married Margaret Smith (ship Pyramus 1832) at Maitland in November 1832. Granted a Ticket of Leave in 1833



Notes and Links

1). Alexander Nisbet was employed as surgeon on the following convict ships to New South Wales:
Grenada 1827
Hooghley 1828
Asia 1830
Earl Grey 1838
Mangles 1840.

He was employed as Assistant Commissioner to the Australian Agricultural Company in 1830 and was a survivor on the Royal Charlotte when she was wrecked in 1825.

2). Convict bushranger Thomas Moss arrived on the Minerva

3). Prisoners and passengers of the Minerva identified in the Hunter Valley

4). Combination - Throwing Vitriol. A. Mackay, P. McConnochie, J. Robertson, W. Walker, and A. Nicholson, tenters, were tried at the Circuit Court of Justiciary, Glasgow, on 28th September for assaulting and beating William Kyle, and also for pouring vitriol on his person, the prisoners being engaged in an illegal combination for the purpose of preventing Kyle from entering the service of Mr. Tod at his steam loom factory. The prisoners were found guilty and sentenced to 14 years transportation. Belfast Newsletter 3 October 1823 (Alexander Mackay, Peter Mackonnichie, William Walker and Archibald Nicholson)

5). Return of Convicts of the Minerva assigned between 1st January 1832 and 31st March 1832 (Sydney Gazette 14 June 1832; 21 June 1832; 28 June 1832).....
Frederick Bolton - Stonecutter assigned to Robert Crawford at Prospect
William Coleman - Boot closer assigned to John Borrus at Lower Branch
Thomas Frost - Carter assigned to Henry Kiernan at Dart Brook
James Hampton - Gardener assigned to Charles Thompson at Clydesdale
William Macalister - Soldier. Assigned to George Barber at Argyle


6). National Archives - Reference: ADM 101/54/5 Description: Medical and surgical journal of the Minerva convict ship from 21 June to 20 November 1824 by Alexander Nisbet, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed in a voyage to New South Wales.

7) 40th Regiment embarked on the following ships:
Embarked 25th April 1823 on Albion. Lieutenant Lowe
Embarked 5th July 1823 on Asia Captain Bishop
Embarked 10th July 1823 on Isabella. Lieutenant Millar
Embarked 18th July 1823 on Sir Godfrey Wilestoe. Captain Hibbert
Embarked 29 July 1823 on Guildford. Captain Thornhill
Embarked 31st July 1823 on Medina. Lieutenant Ganning
Embarked 5 August 1823 on Castle Forbes. Lt.- Col. Balfour;
Embarked 29 December 1823 on Prince Regent. Captain Stewart
Embarked 5th February 1824 on Chapman. Captain Jebb
Embarked 25 February 1824 on Countess of Harcourt. Captain Morow
Embarked 14 June 1824 on Mangles. Lt.- Col Thornton
Embarked 14 June 1824 on Princess Charlotte. Lieut Neilley
Embarked on Ann and; Amelia.

8) *William Jesson died intestate [6]



References

[1] Bateson, Charles, Library of Australian History (1983). The convict ships, 1787-1868 (Australian ed). Library of Australian History, Sydney : pp.346-347

[2] Lambeth Palace Library. Church of England Records Centre

[3] Freeman's Journal 7 December 1824

[4] Sydney Gazette 20th January 1825

[5] Ancestry.com. UK, Royal Navy Medical Journals, 1817-1857. Medical Journal of Alexander Nisbet on the voyage of the Minerva in 1824. The National Archives. Kew, Richmond, Surrey.

[6] The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Thu 6 Jan 1825 Page 4

[7] Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemen's Land Advertiser (Tas. : 1821 - 1825) Fri 7 Jan 1825 Page 4



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