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Item: 175251
Surname: Canney (Canny)
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: October 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: Application to Marry - refused
Details: Henry Canney application to marry Ann Faulkner (born in the colony) refused, Faulkner having lived for 3 years in a state of adultery with the Police Clerk


 
Item: 5950
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1831 14 January
Place: Newcastle
Source: R v Young Hooper & Battie
Details: Overseer at the General Hospital Newcastle


 
Item: 31641
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1828
Place: Newcastle
Source: 1828 Census
Details: Christiana Brown per 'Louisa' lodger with Canny


 
Item: 78650
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1831 14 July
Place: Newcastle
Source: SG
Details: Having obtained his ticket of leave Henry Canny cautioning against giving credit to his wife Ann Canny (Faulkner)


 
Item: 100772
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1828 22 September
Place: Newcastle
Source: Australian Marriages - FamilySearch Historical Records
Details: Marriage of Henry Canny to Ann Faulkner


 
Item: 104736
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1854 11 November
Place: Sydney
Source: MM
Details: Clerk of the record and copying branches in the Legislative Council. Recommended for a pension of 200 pounds because of his onerous duties which he had performed failthfully for many years. The regular pension of 50 pounds would not maintain him as he was nearly blind


 
Item: 104737
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1838 10 February
Place: Parramatta Hospital
Source: SG
Details: Overseer at Parramatta Hospital. Witness in court


 
Item: 104738
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1831 19 July
Place: Newcastle
Source: SG
Details: Cautioning against giving credit to his wife Ann Canny (nee Faulkner) as she had left him in June 1829. Witness Frederick Dixon


 
Item: 170606
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: -
Place: Sydney
Source: Acts and Ordinances of the Governor & Council of New South Wales ..., Volume 1 By New South Wales, Thomas Callaghan
Details: Mr. Henry Canny, a gentleman whose long experience in the Legislative Council Office rendered him perfectly qualified to assist in correcting proofs of Colonial Acts.....


 
Item: 181659
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 28 January 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825 (Ancestry)
Details: William Burton, wards man at the General Hospital charged with absenting himself from the hospital without leave and at improper hours. Henry Kenny (Canny), overseer at the Hospital states - this morning at five olcock Burton was absent from his duty. On making enquiry for him I was informed by the people in the hospital that he had gone out a one oclock. Shortly after he returned bringing with him a number of peaches which he said had been given to him by a settler s man, whose name he did not know. The prisoner makes no defence. William Burton sentenced to 25 lashes and to labour in the gaol gang


 
Item: 17518
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: Prince Regent 1824
Date: 1831 July
Place: Newcastle
Source: SG
Details: Obtained Ticket of Leave


 
Item: 33902
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: Prince Regent 1824
Date: 1828
Place: Newcastle
Source: 1828 Census
Details: Aged 23. Overseer at Hospital


 
Item: 71327
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: Prince Regent 1824
Date: 1828 25 June
Place: Newcastle
Source: Application to Marry
Details: Bond. Application to marry Anne Faulkener


 
Item: 170605
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: Prince Regent 1824
Date: -
Place: -
Source: Convict Indents State Archives NSW; Series: NRS 1156; Item: [X34]
Details: Age 19. Tried in Co. Clare and sentenced to transportation for life for embezzlement


 
Item: 170607
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: Prince Regent 1824
Date: 10 August 1822
Place: Ennis
Source: The Lancaster Gazette and General Advertiser
Details: Henry Canny, late Assistant Deputy Postmaster of Ennis was tried at that town on the 25th July, upon the charge of having embezzled the letters and property of several persons whilst passing through the post office to various parts of the country. The case against the prisoner was conclusively corroborated by the evidence, and after a long and luminous charge from the learned Baron, the Jury returned a verdict of guilty, recommending the prisoner to mercy on account of his youth and being deprived of his parents at an age when he most required their care and advice.


 
Item: 194745
Surname: Canny
First Name: Henry
Ship: Prince Regent 1824
Date: July 1824
Place: Sydney Cove
Source: Convict Indents. State Archives NSW; Series: NRS 12188; Item: [4/4009A]; Microfiche: 654
Details: Henry Canney age 19. Apothecary from Ennis. Tried 22 July 1822. Sentenced to transportation for life. Very well behaved on the voyage out. Assigned to the General Hospital Sydney on arrival


 
Item: 170604
Surname: Canny (Kenny)
First Name: Henry
Ship: Prince Regent 1824
Date: 1825
Place: Newcastle
Source: Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters. Class: HO 10; Piece: 19
Details: Overseer at Newcastle hospital


 
Item: 181584
Surname: Kenny (Canny)
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 22 December 1825
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825 (Ancestry)
Details: John Rolestone, in government service, charged with defrauding the hospital patients of their tea. Henry Kenny (Canny), overseer of the Hospital states. - The patients at the hospital have frequently of late complained to me of their tea being weak. I suspected the cook of some mal practice and watched him. This morning I detected him putting into the copper a bag containing tea leaves, whilst the good tea I had given him remained untouched. The prisoner states - I was going to use the good tea just as the overseer spoke to me. The bag of tea leaves was in the copper by accident. John Rolestone sentenced to 50 lashes


 
Item: 181795
Surname: Kenny (Canny)
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 14 April 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: Patrick Casey in government service, charged with theft....Stephen Walters states - About 22nd March last I was robbed of 19 dollars and a gown piece. I communicated my misfortune to the chief constable. I also stated that I suspected Casey for the robbery. My reason was that on that day he came to my house and asked me to lend him some money which I did. I kept my money in my hat which Casey observing, said it was an unsafe place to keep money in. He then went away. I also left my house and lay down on the grass in front of it. I had placed my hat with the money in it on the table before I went out. I lay on the grass about half an hour. On returning to the house the hat and its contents were gone also the gown piece. There is a back door at the house by which the thief must have entered. None but Casey was in the house when I lent him the money. It was quite a trifling sum I lent him. Casey was in the habit of coming to my house with messages from the hospital. He was at my house once before on that day. My house is near the hospital, my back door is within 50 yards of the Hospital boundary. Casey is a wardsman there. Mr. George Muir states - in consequence of the communication I received from Walters I went in search of Casey. I found him in a state of intoxication. On searching his person I found three dollars, a dump and a small piece of silver, the possession of which he attempted to account for saying he had brought them from Sydney several weeks since. From this statement and other circumstances, so much suspicion attached to the prisoner that he was ordered to gaol, whilst I was making every effort to discover the property. A few days since I had two men in the watch house. They belonged to settlers. One of them as I was informed told the other that the knew where the stolen property was, that the place where it was concealed was pointed out to him by Casey as they were both going from the gaol to the police office some days ago. On my questioning Samuel Ashley (one of the men) as to the truth of this he told me that Ralph Dean was the person who had told him where the plant was and Dean had also informed him that Casey had pointed out the spot. Dean is not at Newcastle, he was sent back to his master at Patterson Plains before I became acquainted with these particulars. Ashly told me the plant was very near the womans hospital in the rear of the house occupied by Walters.I took Ashley and a constable with me. After some little search Ashley separated himself from us and went a short distance off and I heard him almost instantly after exclaim that he had discovered the articles we south for. They were secreted in a post hole. There was the hat, gown piece and a ten dollar note. They are now before the court. Samuel Ashley corroborates and admits the whole of the statement made by Mr. Muir. Enquiry being made by the Bench as to where Ashley was at the time the robbery was committed it was satisfactorily proved that he was at his masters farm at Patrick Plains at the time. Henry Kenny (Canny), Overseer at the hospital states - Casey has been several weeks at the hospital. I never saw any money in his possession if he had had any I am convinced I should not have been ignorant of the circumstance. On the day of the robbery Doctor Brooks had given Casey leave of absence but he was away a considerable time and returned intoxicated. Mr. James Crofts, keeper of the gaol states - Some days since I was bringing Casey and Deane to the police office as I expected there would be an examination that day of Casey and Deane was coming to receive orders to the manner in which he would be disposed of. Casey and Dean were handcuffed together, there was a constable in front of them and I was a short distance in the rear; as we approached the hospital I notice the two men in very earnest conversation. I therefore quickened my pace and heard Casey say there about two rods from that place at the same time pointing towards the womans hospital with his hand. The place where the hat was found was precisely in the direction where Casey pointed. The prisoner denies the charge and states he brought twenty dollars with him from Sydney four months ago. Stephen Walters, states part of my 19 dollars was a ten dollar note, the remainder in silver. Patrick Casey sentenced to a penal settlement for three years


 
Item: 181816
Surname: Kenny (Canny)
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 3 May 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: Thomas Atkinson, in government service, charged with an assault on Mary Ann White, an infant aged 5 years with an intent to commit rape. The following depositions were read over in his presence. Elizabeth Hannell being duly sworn....On Saturday morning the 4th inst., I discovered that my little girl had been seriously injured and that she was in a very bad state from it. I asked her who had done it. She refused to tell me at first, but by threats and promises I induced her to point the person; she took me to a house in which were three men and pointed out Atkinson without hesitation. I sent for a constable and requested him to take charge of the three men which was done. As they past my door the constable desired me to bring out my child that she might point out which of the three has committed the offence. When she again pointed to Atkinson and on my asking her if another of the men had not done it she said no and persisted in pointing out Atkinson. My child told me he had whipped her before he made the attempt and she showed me the place where this affair occurred and said I was away at the time drawing my rations.. Mary Ann White being privately examined by George Brooks stated that she had been hurt by the prisoner... Henry Kenny overseer of the general hospital being duly sworn deposeth and saith - Mary Ann White was brought to me some time since during the absence of Dr Brooks by her mother. It was on the day on which the injury she had sustained was discovered. I examined her. There was a considerable degree of inflammation and a great discharged arising from violence on the private parts. I examined Atkinson he was not diseased. William Cooper being duly sworn deposeth - On Saturday week last I was in an adjoining skilling where Atkinson was and I saw the little girl Mary Ann White, crying. I told her to go home. I went to the door of the house where Atkinson was. I saw only him except Bentley who was lying asleep. I said whoever has been injuring the child deserves everything that is bad. The child had told me that a big man had been hurting her. It was on this account that I made the observation as Atkinson is a stout man and my impression was that he might be the man. The child might have heard me speaking to him. The previous depositions having been read Thomas Atkinson denies the charge, and calls Sarah Perkins, who being duly sworn deposth....Some time since my husband and me lived on Mr. Dillons farm. I took the child with me but was desired by the mother of it Elizabeth Hannell to wash her frequently or else she would get very bad. I washed her going up the river, I continued to wash her at least once a day for some time but having at last neglected to do so for a day or two it became very bad. I never saw a child in such a state before. It was regular discharge. The child was quite well when I returned her to her mother but I have reason to believe she has been frequently in the same state since. Samuel Beckett being sworn...about two years ago I was at Mr. Dillons farm when Sarah Perkins came to live there with this little girl. She used to be washed regularly in the private parts except I believe upon one occasion for two or three days when the child became very bad. I saw a very considerable discharge from her privates which were washed three times a day to my knowledge whilst the complaint was on her. The bench having considered the evidence against the prisoner as well as that produced in his defence are of opinion that he is not guilty of the offence and do order him to be discharged to his duty



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