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Item: 202965
Surname: Tyrrell
First Name: Rev. Lovick
Ship: -
Date: 27 June 1871
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: Inquest into the death of Charles James Smithers, age 43, Clerk of Petty Sessions, who died of a gun-shot wound. Witnesses included 13 year old son Frederick Smithers; son William Smithers, aged 10; son George Henry Smithers; Elizabeth and John Graney, landlord of the Hunter River Hotel; Rev. Lovick Tyrrell; William Bush; Dr. Walter Scott; Constable Patrick Phelan; Christopher Eipper, newspaper reporter; Robert Watt Thompson, clerk of the office of the Superintendent of Police at Maitland; William Henry Mullen who had known Smithers for 28 years; George Clift, neighbour.


 
Item: 34775
Surname: Tyrrell
First Name: Rev. William
Ship: -
Date: 1847 4 September
Place: Newcastle
Source: MM
Details: Degree of Doctor in Divinity conferred at a congregation held on 21 st April at University of Cambridge


 
Item: 88220
Surname: Tyrrell
First Name: Rev. William
Ship: -
Date: 1852 14 February
Place: East Macquarie
Source: MM
Details: Granted 1 acre land


 
Item: 162254
Surname: Tyrrell (obit.,)
First Name: Right Rev. William D.D.,
Ship: -
Date: 25 March 1879
Place: -
Source: SMH
Details: The death of the Right Rev. William Tyrrell D.D., Bishop of Newcastle, which is announced in our telegraphic columns this morning, will be heard of with profound regret by a very large part of the community. He has been ailing for some time past, but, until recently, hopes were entertained of his ultimate recovery. A telegraph, however, yesterday afternoon announced that he was in a comatose state, and that his medical attendants had little hope that he would rally. Their fears were realised, for shortly after that message reached Sydney Bishop Tyrrell was dead. He was born in 1807 and had consequently reached his 72 nd year. He was a son of a former remembrancer of the city of London. His mother was a daughter of the celebrated optician Dollond. He was educated at the Charter House and St. Johns College, Cambridge, where he gained a scholarship and graduated as fourth senior optima. Having held some parochial preferments in England, on the division of the Bishopric of Australia in 1847, he was appointed first Bishop of Newcastle. And the whole of his subsequent life may be regarded as a fitting testimony of the wisdom of the appointment. The Church of England has never had a mor generous, warm hearted, or harder working adherent than she had in the late prelate. Into the work of the church he threw his whole soul, and by the magnanimous disposal of his property in behalf of the Church for which he laboured, his name in the Newcastle diocese will be had in everlasting remembrance



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