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Item: 77140
Surname: Mason
First Name: Dr. Martin
Ship: -
Date: 1801 24 October
Place: Newcastle
Source: HR NSW. Vol. IV. Hunter and King. 1800, 1801, 1802. Edby F. M. Bladen. p 597 - 598
Details: In command of the settlement at Coal River. Requesting Gov. King to send tools, candles etc. for mining


 
Item: 166466
Surname: Mason
First Name: Dr. Martin
Ship: Britannia 1798
Date: -
Place: -
Source: The history of New South Wales: from its first discovery to the present time .By G. Paterson
Details: State to the Court the character and situation of Martin Mason in the colony of New South Wales. Martin Mason, sir, came out to New South Wales as surgeon of a merchant ship, I believe of a convict ship. After a considerable time, Gov. King, in consideration, as I believe, of his large family, having five children, appointed him Superintendent at a place called Toongabbee, where the worst characters were sent. A Member. Does Superintendent import Superintendent of convicts, or Superintendent of works? Superintendent of convicts and of labour, sir: he was at the same time sworn in as a magistrate. After some time, various complaints came to me of oppression and otherwise ill conduct on his part towards the convicts; but as I knew the desperate set he had to deal with, I took little or no notice of them. At last, sir, a charge of a very serious nature was stated to the Governor, (Gov. King) which was, that Mr Mason having looked with an eye of cupidity (if I may be allowed the expression) on one of the convict women, but who refused to gratify him, he had tied her to a post, where she remained the. whole night. This was inquired into by a Bench of Magistrates, of which I was one, when the fact was clearly proved; and in consequence he never was permitted to act as a magistrate afterwards, and the magistrates actually refused to act with him: among others, Mr Marsden refused, I refused; he was not permitted, to my knowledge, to act as a magistrate either at Toongabbee or at the Hawkesbury. By the Court. Was he dismissed? I don't know that he was dismissed, but I never knew him after that as a magistrate; myself and the other magistrates refused to act with him; but whether he was formally dismissed by the Governor, I cannot say. Did he still continue Superintendent of the convicts? I believe he did, but I am not certain of that. After some time, sir, Gov. King sent him to superintend the convicts at a place they call Hunter's River, or most commonly the Coal River, where the worst of the convicts are sent. Even worse than those you first mentioned? Even worse than those, sir; we have all descriptions of them. He had not been there any great length of time before complaints upon complaints came to Sydney against him for cruelty and oppression, such as was really shocking to think of. He was sent for to Sydney, and the Commanding Officer at Hunter's River was desired to send such evidence as he might think necessary to prove the fact, which he did. The matter came before a Bench of Magistrates a second time, when it was clearly proved that he had been guilty of those oppressions and tyranny. There were two men brought, sir, who were so ill that we were obliged to take their evidence lying on the ground; and they swore positively they were in that state owing to the ill treatment which they had received from Mr Mason, and which was corroborated by other evidence. What sort of ill treatment was it that this was owing to? To over-labour, sir; and punishments of different kinds. Was he dismissed? Yes, sir. By Gov. King? Yes, sir. You say, positively, he was dismissed; that he did not resign? He was dismissed, sir; and afterwards went to the Hawkesbury and acted as surgeon there: he had some land given him in consideration of his family, which he did not cultivate, but lived upon his professional means as surgeon among the settlers.The evidence of Judge-Advocate Richard Atkins at the trial of Lieut-Col George Johnston (England)


 
Item: 112902
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: -
Date: 1811 7 May
Place: General court-marital at Chelsea Hospital
Source: The History of NSW by G. Paterson. Published by Mackenzie and Dent 1811 (Appendix)
Details: Examined on the part of the Prosecution at the trial of Lieut-Col. George Johnston


 
Item: 112904
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: -
Date: Letter dated 23 March 1809
Place: Sydney
Source: HR NSW. Vol VII. Bligh & Macquarie 1809 - 1811 pp.86-88
Details: Letter from Rev. H. Fulton to Viscount Castlereagh - 'As many persons came to address the Governor when he embarked, and state their grievances, they intercepted one Doctor Mason, and took his papers from him lest the true state of the colony should reach your Lordship'


 
Item: 156987
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: -
Date: 1807 12 July
Place: Hawkesbury River
Source: History of New South Wales (O'Hara) (Google Books)
Details: Extracted a bullet from the head of Henry Abbot, who had accidentally shot himself


 
Item: 166720
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: -
Date: 9 May 1812
Place: -
Source: SG
Details: Mr. Martin Mason had been provided with a passage on the Mary from England to Australia, but went on shore at Portsmouth when the ship was ready to get underway, and not returning in time lost his passage. Others returning on the Mary included William Gore, Rev. Fulton Mr. Sutter etc


 
Item: 168018
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: -
Date: 3 May 1810
Place: Sydney
Source: Colonial Secretary's Correpondence. Copies of letters ent 1809 - 1813. Item 4/3490C p.21
Details: Circular to John Palmer, Richard Atkins, John Williamson, William Gore, Rev. Fulton, George Sutton, Martin Mason, Frederick Oakes, Nicholas Divine, George Caley. (Extract) His Majesty's ships under the Command of Commodore Bligh will positively sail for England on Sunday 6 May and it is His Excellency's express direction that you repair on board H.M. Hindostan with all your baggage in order to prosecute your voyage to England and that having embarked you do not again come on shore


 
Item: 168639
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: -
Date: 28 October 1911
Place: Sydney
Source: SMH
Details: Among other interesting things, the first private practitioner in Australia was Martin Mason, who in 1804 established himself at the Hawkesbury after serving three years as Acting Assistant Surgeon of the colony....From the History of the Sydney Hospital from 1811 - 1911 by Dr. J. Frederick Watson.


 
Item: 112903
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: Britannia 1798
Date: 1811 7 May
Place: General court-marital at Chelsea Hospital
Source: The History of NSW by G. Paterson. Published by Mackenzie and Dent 1811 (Appendix)
Details: Details of performance as Magistrate and work as surgeon and settler given by Richard Atkins, Judge Advocate of the Colony at the trial of Lieut-Col Johnston


 
Item: 112905
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: Britannia 1798
Date: Memorial of Martin Mason dated 14th August 1811
Place: Sydney
Source: HR NSW. Vol VII. Bligh & Macquarie 1809 - 1811 pp.576,577
Details: Acting surgeon on the ship Buffalo on a voyage to the Cape. Appointed Acting Assistant Surgeon in the colony 23 October 1800; twice imprisinoned for his loyalty to Bligh and during the first imprisonment his son was drowned by a lunatic. Right leg fractured while he was in prison the 2nd time. Family left destitute


 
Item: 112914
Surname: Mason
First Name: Martin
Ship: Britannia 1798
Date: Governor King to the Duke of Portland. Despatch No. 6. 1 March 1802
Place: Port Jackson
Source: HRA, Series 1, Volume III 1801 - 1802, p406
Details: Martin Mason, in command at the Coal River, said to have conducted himself improperly. Mason withdrawn from the settlement



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