Free Settler or Felon
Convict and Colonial History


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169859
Surname: Big Headed Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1839
Place: Lake Macquarie/Newcastle
Source: Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition During the ..., Volume 2 By Charles Wilkes
Details: In their walks they came across a group of several blacks (natives) seated around a small fire; they were pointed out as the remnant of the tribes which about forty years ago wandered in freedom over the plains of the Hunter and around the borders of Lake Macquarie. Their appearance was wretched in the extreme: emaciated limbs, shapeless bodies, immense heads, deep-set glaring eyes, thickly matted hair, and the whole begrimed with dirt and red- paint, gave them an aspect hardly human. The dress (if such it could be called) of the women, was a loose ragged gown, and of the men, a strip of blanket wrapped round the middle, or a pair of tattered pantaloons, which but half performed their office. Mr. Threlkeld s conveyance did not arrive, and not being able to get another, they determined to walk to Lake Macquarie, and for this purpose they resorted to the natives as guides, and by a great deal of coaxing and promises of bull (grog), their natural repugnance to make an exertion was overcome. An evidence of the pride which characterizes these natives was shown in this interview. One of them, whose sobriquet was Big-headed Blackboy, was stretched out before the fire, and no answer could be obtained from him, but a drawling repetition, in grunts of displeasure


167428
Surname: Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 4 April 1848
Place: West Maitland
Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Details: Aboriginal Murder.-On Wednesday morning, the body of a black-fellow, named Black Boy, a member of the Newcastle tribe, was found lying dead in the yard of the Queens Head Inn West Maitland. The poor fellow had been killed apparently by some heavy blows with a tomahawk about the ear, as he was lying asleep; and, from his easy posture, appeared to have died instantly, and without the slightest struggle. For some months past Black Boy had been working about Maitland, cutting wood and carrying water for different persons, and was very harmless and quiet. What may have been the cause of his murder is not known, but it was most probably some old grudge. On Tuesday last Black Boy and three members of the Old Banks tribe were about a good deal together, and in the evening Black Roy and one of the Old Banks tribe (a tall fellow, with one eye,) camped together in the Queen s Head yard. About ten o clock in the evening, the one-eyed black went into the Queens Head kitchen with an old quart pot, to beg some hot water to make tea. The water was given to him in the -pot, which he said contained tea; and from that moment not a sound was heard from the yard all night. In the morning Black Boy was found murdered as above described, but the one-eyed black had disappeared, as well as the pot and every other article the two had possessed. On Wednesday afternoon an inquest was held on the body, before J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner, when Dr. Sloan made a post mortem examination, and found that, although there were several jagged incised wounds on the right side of the head, neither the scull nor jaw was fractured: death, in his opinion, was caused by a wound inflicted over the carotid artery, rupturing its fibres, mid causing an effusion of blood, ending in death. It appeared from the evidence that on the Monday night previously, Black Boy had suddenly left the camping place where he was sleeping with some of the Old Banks blacks and next day gave as a reason that they were going to kill him. The Jury returned a verdict that Black Boy was wilfully murdered by some black or blacks unknown


167434
Surname: Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 6 May 1848
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: Death of an Aboriginal from Wounds received in Fighting.-On Friday se night two aboriginals of the Maitland tribe quarrelled about a gin, and fought for some time. At length one of them, named Gorman, gained the victory, beating his opponent, Black Boy, so savagely about the head with a waddy, as to leave him senseless on the field of battle, just on the outskirts of the town. Black Boy lingered till Sunday, and then died, from the effects of the injuries he had received. On Monday he was buried by the tribe, who, whether purposely or not we do not know, buried him in a paddock, where a lot of bullocks were running, selecting a spot which the bullocks used as a road;after interring the body the blacks beat and smoothed the earth above it till it was quite level with that around, and the bullocks having walked backwards and forwards over it as usual, the spot has become quite undistinguishable to the eye of a white man


168716
Surname: Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: February 1843
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: State Archives NSW; Item: 2/2009; Roll: 757.....Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Gaol Description and Entrance Books
Details: Black Boy and Joe Brace from Maitland admitted to Newcastle gaol under sentence of 1 month in the cells or a fine of 5 pounds for exposing their person


182320
Surname: Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 29 December 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: John Byrne per John Barry and Michael Toomy per Hooghley, both in government service charged with theft. John Cooper states - On Tuesday last on my return from my work, I found that my house had been forcibly entered and that one shirt, one pair of trowsers, and a blanket belonging to myself and a short and pair of trowsers belonging to James Kellet had been carried off. Some stolen articles belonging to James Wilkins who also lived in the house were missing. The staple of the front door had been forced and the back door had been opened apparently on the inside. I immediately reported the circumstances to Constable Peter Riley. About an hour after William Webster who is the government servant of the Rev. Middleton, came to me saying that he understood I had been robbed and that a black native called Black Boy could show me where the things were. I went to the native who took me to the hollow behind the church where I found the blanket and one of the shirts which had been stolen. I asked if he knew who put them there. He said twas Duffy and a man who lived at my house. ON my questioning Duffy he told me he had not robbed me himself but he knew who had. Timothy Duffy states - I saw Byrne and Toomy together on Tuesday morning between the hours of 8 and 9 near where I live and at a little distance from Coopers. They were coming in the direction from the back of his house. Toomy had a bundle in his hand. Toomy and Byrne came to the door of my hut. Byrne lives in the hut with me, he went in and staid from ten to twenty minutes. Toomy wanted to go in also but I would not suffer him as I thought he had come dishonestly by the bundle which he carried upon which Toomy went away with it over the Hill towards the Church. I did not mention any of these circumstances to the constables until I was taken to the watch house on suspicion of being concerned in the robbery. The prisoner deny the charge and call in their defence William PItt who being sworn states - I was at the house adjoining where Duffy lives on Tuesday morning a little after 8 o clock. I saw a man with a bundle under his arm coming from the back of Coopers house. I had no suspicion of anything wrong. I thought he might be taking linen from the Parsonage to the washerwoman, as the path from there into the town passes at the back of Coopers. I do not know the man who carried the bundle. He was much taller than either of the prisoners who I know well. John Corrigan, states - I went to my work on Tuesday morning at six o clock at the mines. Byrne works there also. He works below. There are two spells. I am not certain whether he remained at the mines or went away during his spell hour. The Bench taking into their consideration the notoriously bad character of the witness Duffy acquit the prisoners


177078
Surname: Black boy (Teta) (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: June 1850
Place: Singleton
Source: State Library of NSW. Papers relating to Aborigines in the Singleton District, Blanket for Native Blacks, Colonial Secretarys Office
Details: Age 33. On Return of Aborigines to receive blankets